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PostPosted: Tue Oct 09, 2012 11:57 am 
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Adventure Rider
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Thanks very helpful & bookmarked! :s_thumbsup

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PostPosted: Wed Apr 24, 2013 8:32 pm 
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nc rick wrote:
The dr shock damper adjuster effects the compression damping by changing the preload of a blow off plate. The shock makes very light damping stock and the blowoff is only effective to a small degree effecting compression damping mostly at higher damper shaft speeds. I recommend that we do not use the last two clicks of cw adjustment because of some bad effect to the damper (I theorize the spring becomes coil bound). On the shock dyno we see some presure balance problems exhibited as hysteresis on the compression force plot.


So, you're saying that the DR has a high speed compression adjustment (preload on the shim stack) on the rear shock, and no low speed adjustments at all?
Is this normal for a dual sport?
I am more familliar with street bikes, and this would be a very uncomon setup on a streetbike shock. Only highend shocks on street bikes offer a highspeed adjustment, and then only in conjunction with both low speed compression and rebound adjustments.


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 19, 2013 10:02 am 
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The compression adjustment parts are in the reservoir and there is no real low damper speed adjustment available. Is it normal? Well, not uncommon as a cost saving measure.

The rebound adjuster system, like the one we add to the bike is on all higher end shocks but is expensive due to the quantity and kinds of parts needed.


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 19, 2013 10:47 am 
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Im not sure you could call it a high or low speed comp adjuster, just comp in general. I think were lucky to even get that. Cheaper road bikes sometimes only have a rebound adjuster on the shock. It took me years to appreciate hi and low speed comp on my other bike. Being able to adjust rebound on forks is handy for cold days when cold wind blows on the fork tubes and you can soften rebound alot to get things moving and warmed up then stiffen it back up later in the day, once you get the hang of the adjusters they are useful. But sometimes a little knowledge just gets you in trouble and better off with no options to stuff up :blush:


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 19, 2013 11:14 am 
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foaminsert wrote:
But sometimes a little knowledge just gets you in trouble and better off with no options to stuff up :blush:


Hasn't Apple got the iShock out yet? Oh wait, BMW did on their latest dual and tarmac rockets. I just wonder if you have to buy some PIN shaped tool or you have to Pair the fork legs on each setting :tease:

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PostPosted: Sun Sep 29, 2013 1:06 am 
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DustDevil wrote:
The very first thing that should be done after buying a bike is an overall safety check.

After mounting the Suzuki luggage rack on my new DR, I was checking the turn signals to make sure the connections were a-ok. Imagine my surprise when I found that the front turn signals (which I had not touched) were working opposite the switch position (right was left and left was right!). They came that way from the dealership :OMG: . Lucky It didn't cause an accident, and bad on me for not doing a complete once over before my first ride.

Rgds, Fred

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PostPosted: Mon Feb 03, 2014 4:49 pm 
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Quick question, I thought the front fork is not adjustable at all? I looked around and people recommend heavier oil, different springs and a set of Intiminators. So is there a way to adjust the stock front fork?


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 03, 2014 9:05 pm 
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Devorlast wrote:
Quick question, I thought the front fork is not adjustable at all? I looked around and people recommend heavier oil, different springs and a set of Intiminators. So is there a way to adjust the stock front fork?

All those ways...and sliding up or down in the triple clamps :howdy:

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PostPosted: Mon Feb 03, 2014 9:40 pm 
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Devorlast wrote:
Quick question, I thought the front fork is not adjustable at all? I looked around and people recommend heavier oil, different springs and a set of Intiminators. So is there a way to adjust the stock front fork?


The stock forks are not adjustable; however, you can modify them with aftermarket parts to suit them to your needs.

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PostPosted: Mon Feb 02, 2015 8:33 pm 
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Different fork oil weight will have an effect on compression but will be much more noticable on the rebound stroke. Given that your rebound is directly responsible for both traction and control I would not suggest you compromise this aspect in order to solve a compression issue. The comp holes in the damper rods are so large they are almost ineffective By adjusting oil height you will gain or reduce bottoming resistance. Adding preload to the fork springs will create more resistance initially but the stock spring rate is way too soft and iit would be best to replace them. There are a number of valves available now with varying degrees of effectiveness. The Race Tech emulators offer the widest tuning range and most appropriate / accurate technical advice.


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