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PostPosted: Tue Aug 08, 2017 4:27 pm 
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Adventure Rider
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Well, that's the way Scottoiler would have a new user set it up. My beef with them is their instructions dump 5 times more oil on the chain than is really necessary (IMO). Trying to adjust it to 5 minutes per drip is not really practical. As I already said, my method for dialing it in was to keep the chain looking like it was lubed 2 days ago. Nothing to do with either hours or mileage, just amount of lube on the chain. For those folks who want their chain to always look wet go ahead and pour on more oil. If you don't mind a greasy mess on your luggage follow the Scottoiler instructions.

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PostPosted: Tue Aug 08, 2017 6:17 pm 
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Adventure Rider
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LA Thumper wrote:
I'm curious what the chain tightening intervals on the DR are when using conventional lube from a can. I don't ever recall never tightening the chain slack after 5000 miles :s_dunno not even close! :aggressive:

No set interval on chain adjustment. If it looks LOOSE ... it needs adjusting. How often your chain needs adjustment depends mostly on age of chain, it's quality and your riding style.
Things that WEAR a chain or can cause need for more frequent adjustment:
1. Weather, rain riding, riding dirt or mud all can affect chain's need for maintenance/adjustment and chain life. How often it needs adjustment may relate to it's age. Typically, once frequent adjustment of your chain is required ... it's near it's end.
2. High Speed and hard or soft riding. Very hard riding will use up chain more quickly than taking it easy. (obvious)
3. Wheelies wear out chains quite quickly if done often.
4. Quality of the chain you have on your bike. Not all equal. Stock, OEM is a DID mid level O ring chain. It's pretty good, most get 12K miles + out of it. But DID make other, higher quality chains which may last double of OEM. I recently replaced my DID VM-2 X ring (similar to currrent top of the line DID ZVM X ring) at 26,000 miles. It could have gone further, did NOT need adjustment!

O ring chains will wear out sooner and as said earlier, will need frequent adjustment near end of chain life.

I constructed an improvised gravity feed chain oiler for my former DL1000 V-Strom. It was good on very long rides, especially in rain. Rain is the reason the Scot Oiler was invented. It rains year round in the UK. Rain quickly washes off most
chain lubes and rain can wear out chains prematurely ... so the Scot makes sense in those conditions.

I adjusted my oiler by restricting the vent. I used 90 wt. gear oil. Flow was also dependent on exhaust heat. In super hot weather it flowed a bit more than needed and like many mis adjusted Scot oilers, made a mess of back wheel and luggage. Not a big deal
and could be dealt with.

YOU DO HAVE TO BE CAREFUL THAT NO OIL GETS ONTO YOUR REAR TIRE.

Never happened to me but, most times flow adjustment was OK. I never bothered to put Oiler on my DR650. Dirt riding,
lube picked up sand and grit, makes a grinding paste, not good for chain or sprocket life. Some say just
UP THE FLOW ... and oil will wash off dirt. sorry, that does not work! Too much dirt! And huge mess created on rear wheel. YMMV.

An oiler would be OK on long, multi day rides but I've now resigned myself when on tour to doing my usual daily chain cleaning and maintenance routine. I do daily chain cleaning / oiling ... also safety check, looking at tires, wheels, hardware, chain, sprockets and anything that looks "wrong".

Amazing the things I've found that needed attention. It takes me about 10 minuted total, includes a quick wipe down of rear wheel, swing arm if needed. Motels will give you FREE rags! (old towels)

In dry weather I like Dupont Teflon "Chain Saver". Seems to work well, does not pick up much grit or sand. Almost no
fling if you let it set couple hours after application. Rain? 90 wt. gear oil. :howdy:


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PostPosted: Tue Aug 08, 2017 6:40 pm 
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Adventure Rider
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Joined: Mon Aug 11, 2014 5:12 pm
Posts: 2586
Location: South Central PA
ProCycle wrote:
Well, that's the way Scottoiler would have a new user set it up. My beef with them is their instructions dump 5 times more oil on the chain than is really necessary (IMO). Trying to adjust it to 5 minutes per drip is not really practical. As I already said, my method for dialing it in was to keep the chain looking like it was lubed 2 days ago. Nothing to do with either hours or mileage, just amount of lube on the chain. For those folks who want their chain to always look wet go ahead and pour on more oil. If you don't mind a greasy mess on your luggage follow the Scottoiler instructions.


How is it that I do not experience greasy luggage, oily wheels or a glopped up frame running at or near the Scott oil suggested 2 drips per minute? What I experience as generally stated before is my bikes are no more greasy, oily or otherwise dirty than when I used Dupont chain saver, Maxima chain wax, WD40, Unicorn tallow or any other chain lubricant under the sun.

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PostPosted: Tue Aug 08, 2017 7:09 pm 
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Adventure Rider
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I guess you are just lucky but I'm not talking about your bike only my own personal experience. At 2 drops per minute I had gooey grease spots all over the bottom and left surfaces of my Wolfman duffel, on the bottom of the left passenger grab rail, all over my rear rim and tire sidewall, inside surface of my left pannier. All within the first half day of riding. All that lube was NOT protecting my chain. At that point I dialed it way back and rode on until the chain started to look dry. Then slowly turned it up until the chain remained looking 'moist'. No mess, many long days of riding between refills, long chain life :2_thumbsup:

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PostPosted: Tue Aug 08, 2017 9:09 pm 
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MSF Student
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Joined: Sat Apr 15, 2017 7:48 pm
Posts: 29
Location: Central California
I just started using the Cobrra Nemo2 chain oiler this year. It's manually activated so you can adjust how much oil hits the chain every time. It's nice to be able to stop the oil at any time or add extra oil when needed.



http://www.webbikeworld.com/t2/cobrra-n ... ntents.jpg

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PostPosted: Tue Aug 08, 2017 10:43 pm 
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Adventure Rider
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Joined: Wed Nov 02, 2016 6:15 pm
Posts: 506
Location: Los Angeles
DR Grifter wrote:
No set interval on chain adjustment. If it looks LOOSE ... it needs adjusting. How often your chain needs adjustment depends mostly on age of chain, it's quality and your riding style.
Things that WEAR a chain or can cause need for more frequent adjustment:
1. Weather, rain riding, riding dirt or mud all can affect chain's need for maintenance/adjustment and chain life. How often it needs adjustment may relate to it's age. Typically, once frequent adjustment of your chain is required ... it's near it's end.
2. High Speed and hard or soft riding. Very hard riding will use up chain more quickly than taking it easy. (obvious)
3. Wheelies wear out chains quite quickly if done often.
4. Quality of the chain you have on your bike. Not all equal. Stock, OEM is a DID mid level O ring chain. It's pretty good, most get 12K miles + out of it. But DID make other, higher quality chains which may last double of OEM. I recently replaced my DID VM-2 X ring (similar to currrent top of the line DID ZVM X ring) at 26,000 miles. It could have gone further, did NOT need adjustment!

O ring chains will wear out sooner and as said earlier, will need frequent adjustment near end of chain life.

I constructed an improvised gravity feed chain oiler for my former DL1000 V-Strom. It was good on very long rides, especially in rain. Rain is the reason the Scot Oiler was invented. It rains year round in the UK. Rain quickly washes off most
chain lubes and rain can wear out chains prematurely ... so the Scot makes sense in those conditions.

I adjusted my oiler by restricting the vent. I used 90 wt. gear oil. Flow was also dependent on exhaust heat. In super hot weather it flowed a bit more than needed and like many mis adjusted Scot oilers, made a mess of back wheel and luggage. Not a big deal
and could be dealt with.

YOU DO HAVE TO BE CAREFUL THAT NO OIL GETS ONTO YOUR REAR TIRE.

Never happened to me but, most times flow adjustment was OK. I never bothered to put Oiler on my DR650. Dirt riding,
lube picked up sand and grit, makes a grinding paste, not good for chain or sprocket life. Some say just
UP THE FLOW ... and oil will wash off dirt. sorry, that does not work! Too much dirt! And huge mess created on rear wheel. YMMV.

An oiler would be OK on long, multi day rides but I've now resigned myself when on tour to doing my usual daily chain cleaning and maintenance routine. I do daily chain cleaning / oiling ... also safety check, looking at tires, wheels, hardware, chain, sprockets and anything that looks "wrong".

Amazing the things I've found that needed attention. It takes me about 10 minuted total, includes a quick wipe down of rear wheel, swing arm if needed. Motels will give you FREE rags! (old towels)

In dry weather I like Dupont Teflon "Chain Saver". Seems to work well, does not pick up much grit or sand. Almost no
fling if you let it set couple hours after application. Rain? 90 wt. gear oil. :howdy:


Having been riding all sorts of bikes for over 40 years I am no stranger to chain maintenance routines. I was making a general inquiry on how the chain on the DR holds-up not taking into account where and how the bike is ridded which gets into all kinds of variables but your post is still appreciated.

90W gear oil, now that's a good choice for lube with the high film strength of such a high viscosity oil. I don't think the small orifice of the Scotts system would pass that kind of oil unless it was heated as you stated.

Yea, I will back-off on the flow rate. I don't see any oil making it's way to the tire even with my current flow rate. With the lean angles I'm taking this bike to on the road if I was getting oil on the outer cogs would have become very apparent by now plus it would have dirt sticking to the rear tire like Velcro and is dry and clean as bones in a desert.

This is a good topic to broach. The extended chain/sprocket life it affords will pay for the system x2 before they need replacement :s_smile

"Rain" ............. never heard of it! :s_dunno From your description it doesn't sound like a good thing I feel bad for the brits they should do something about that


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 09, 2017 1:38 pm 
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Adventure Rider
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Joined: Mon Aug 11, 2014 5:12 pm
Posts: 2586
Location: South Central PA
Biggest contributing factory in the chain longevity when using a Scot oiler is it is continually oiled and continually cleaned.

As for 90 gear oil it will flow through a Scot oiler you just need to open the valve more towards "prime" position. Numbers wise an even better alternative to 90 weight gear oil would be Redline Heavy Shockproof. If has flow characteristics of 75w-90 but is 75w-250 weight. If Readline Heavy Shockproof is resistant to shear and the forces the rear differential of an NHRA top fuel dragster has a mere chain and sprockets should be no issue.

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PostPosted: Wed Aug 09, 2017 1:52 pm 
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Joined: Wed Jul 20, 2011 3:20 pm
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Location: California
LA Thumper wrote:
This is a good topic to broach. The extended chain/sprocket life it affords will pay for the system x2 before they need replacement :s_smile
:howdy:
Theories on chain/sprocket life related to Scot oilers go every which way. I feel that if a lot of off road riding is done, then the Scot will not extend chain life ... in fact, may LOWER chain life.

After years off road riding/racing/AMA Enduro ... I learned from the pros that you should always run your chain DRY riding off road. NO LUBE.

We do look after our chains and clean and treat them with WD40 after every ride. Using lube off road does not help, in fact many say hinders chain life. YMMV.

I do believe that for ON ROAD riding, the Scot does help chain life and really helps during rain riding. :2_thumbsup: (IMHO)
LA Thumper wrote:
"Rain" ............. never heard of it! :s_dunno From your description it doesn't sound like a good thing I feel bad for the brits they should do something about that

I grew up in LA so get the no rain thing. NorCal is bit different if we're not in a 10 year drought!

What I see most on bikes in general is poor chain care. It's understandable as today's best chains are so good, they hardly need
an care, oiling, cleaning or anything. I'm old school and still do the laborious tasks of cleaning, care and oiling. 25K miles out of a chain is way better than bad old days where chains would be done in 5 or 6K miles. Back then we'd also run chains/sprockets in a terrible state and just keep pouring on oil and keep adjusting ... and hope for the best. :s_no

I see bikes all the time with really nasty grunge build up, worn sprockets and worse. A real tell tale is to look under front sprocket cover ... check out the THICK nasty grunge build up under there. This mostly from the sticky, gloppy chain lubes which are now unpopular.


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 09, 2017 9:08 pm 
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SuperMoto Dude
SuperMoto Dude

Joined: Fri Sep 14, 2012 11:45 pm
Posts: 443
Location: Western Kentucky
Location: Land of fast women, and beautiful horses
I use the Tutoro oiler and agree, for street duty a chain oiler is a great unit to have. I have about 5000 miles since I put it on and I really like it! I use a fill about every 3000 miles. Using an ISO 60 air compressor oil that is light weight and biodegradable. I think the light weight oil is a good lube. Cleans up easily with WD40 and keeps the O-rings nice and pliable.

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