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PostPosted: Mon May 30, 2016 8:06 pm 
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Adventure Rider
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Joined: Fri Jul 12, 2013 6:20 am
Posts: 691
Location: Central Coast NSW Australia
Favoured systems for pure and unsupported adventuring or just a quick brew-up on one day blasts.

Image

Or if the weather is adverse, I'm too lazy or no firewood available.

Image

On the supported rides an espresso machine has lately become the de rigueur.

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PostPosted: Thu Jun 02, 2016 4:04 am 
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Joined: Sat Nov 29, 2014 3:37 pm
Posts: 69
Location: Waikato, New Zealand
LostInPA wrote:
What is bannock?


A term I got from Americans for "soda bread" which Australians call "damper".
Basically it is bread made with baking soda rather than yeast.
The most basic I've made: 1 Cup flour, 1 tablespoon sugar, 1 teaspoon baking power & under 1/4 teaspoon of salt. Mix that, add water to get the right consistency and then cook in a greased fry pan with a lid on it, low heat would be best to let it cook without burning the crap out of it.
I make mine with sultanas and some whole grains added - tasty and filling.
For making it while camping I'll put together the dry ingredients in a ziplock bag then at the camp-site I dump the contents of the bag into a bowl, add water and mix it up then scrape it all into the frying pan.

I take a small frying pan when I go camping and I also take a stainless steel plate, the plate works fairly effectively as a lid for the pan.
I could probably cook the bannock/damper/soda bread over an alcohol stove or any other stove that doesn't cook stuff too fast.
Boiling water is much easier, no problem with a hot stove that boils water faster and I've never personally managed to burn the water.
But for cooking some foods it is really handy to be able to adjust the flame as required.


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PostPosted: Thu Jun 02, 2016 4:13 am 
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bdesj wrote:
LostInPA wrote:
What is bannock?
Perfect system as long as you don`t mind carrying two fuel canisters on weekend trips. Those tiny little butane stoves suddenly get really bulky with a pair of fat steel cans along. Personally, I`m not willing to pack that much extra.


I ride a Suzuki DR650 mule, it carries a heap and I haven't managed to break its back yet!

I have now switched to Wolfman Expedition dry saddlebags and still have the 110 litre bag I've been using for a while. I've got a decent amount of capacity for carrying stuff and 2 cylinders aren't all that bulky IMO.

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I didn't even take cooking gear on that trip, but I'm sure I could have squeezed in a stove & a couple of cylinders.


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PostPosted: Thu Jun 02, 2016 11:25 am 
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Joined: Fri Dec 12, 2014 6:49 am
Posts: 49
Location: Somerset, England.
Hey guys,

Am I the only one who uses a Trangia? I have the mini for solo trips, the burner, stand, pot, pan and handle weigh in at 330g (11.6oz). Its a brilliant bit of kit that you can cook good food on.

Bren

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Current Suzuki DR650 -The Mule. DR350 - The Bouncer. DR125 - The Project.
Previous: KLX250S, DRZ400.


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PostPosted: Thu Jun 02, 2016 11:39 am 
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Adventure Rider
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Joined: Sat Jun 28, 2014 11:45 pm
Posts: 915
Location: Reno, NV
KiwiMark wrote:
I ride a Suzuki DR650 mule, it carries a heap and I haven't managed to break its back yet!

I have now switched to Wolfman Expedition dry saddlebags and still have the 110 litre bag I've been using for a while. I've got a decent amount of capacity for carrying stuff and 2 cylinders aren't all that bulky IMO.
Coffee for all! :drinks:

Brenhden wrote:
Hey guys,

Am I the only one who uses a Trangia?
Maybe. They are available in the US, but I get the impression they aren`t so popular outside of Europe. Home made "meths" stoves seem to be somewhat common among backpackers and bicyclists here (more so than production models), but I think white gas and butane still hold the lions share, and kerosene stoves are very rare nowadays. And I think the Aussies would balk at the thought of wasting alcohol by setting it on fire!


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PostPosted: Sat Jun 04, 2016 4:24 am 
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Joined: Sat Nov 29, 2014 3:37 pm
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Location: Waikato, New Zealand
Brenhden wrote:
Hey guys,

Am I the only one who uses a Trangia? I have the mini for solo trips, the burner, stand, pot, pan and handle weigh in at 330g (11.6oz). Its a brilliant bit of kit that you can cook good food on.

Bren


I have one that I bought from Amazon, I also have some home made alcohol stoves and another purchased alcohol stove. They are all OK at boiling water and the Trangia does have the ability to vary the flame with the thing in the lid, but I prefer my butane stove for easier adjusting of the flame and for the cleaner burning.


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 05, 2016 1:00 am 
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Adventure Rider
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Joined: Tue Dec 15, 2015 9:03 am
Posts: 911
Location: Central PA
KiwiMark wrote:
LostInPA wrote:
What is bannock?


A term I got from Americans for "soda bread" which Australians call "damper".
Basically it is bread made with baking soda rather than yeast.
The most basic I've made: 1 Cup flour, 1 tablespoon sugar, 1 teaspoon baking power & under 1/4 teaspoon of salt. Mix that, add water to get the right consistency and then cook in a greased fry pan with a lid on it, low heat would be best to let it cook without burning the crap out of it.
I make mine with sultanas and some whole grains added - tasty and filling.
For making it while camping I'll put together the dry ingredients in a ziplock bag then at the camp-site I dump the contents of the bag into a bowl, add water and mix it up then scrape it all into the frying pan.

I take a small frying pan when I go camping and I also take a stainless steel plate, the plate works fairly effectively as a lid for the pan.
I could probably cook the bannock/damper/soda bread over an alcohol stove or any other stove that doesn't cook stuff too fast.
Boiling water is much easier, no problem with a hot stove that boils water faster and I've never personally managed to burn the water.
But for cooking some foods it is really handy to be able to adjust the flame as required.


Very cool. I'm going to make some my next camp trip. Which gives me an idea for a thread...

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PostPosted: Sun Jun 05, 2016 3:29 pm 
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Joined: Sat Nov 29, 2014 3:37 pm
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Location: Waikato, New Zealand
LostInPA wrote:
Very cool. I'm going to make some my next camp trip


Try making some at home first. I prefer to practice at home because on a camping trip I can't just start again when I screw it up.


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 15, 2016 10:45 pm 
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Joined: Fri Jul 12, 2013 6:20 am
Posts: 691
Location: Central Coast NSW Australia
The traditional Aussie Bushmans way of making damper.

Plain flour a pinch of salt and water kneaded into a tacky dough, shaped up and dusted with a bit of dry flour.
Cooked and covered in the white ash of a dying fire or in the cooler side of a big fire.
The soft white ash of an old mulga wood or hardwood fire is the best to cook in. Potatoes in their jacket - yum.
Get it right and the ash can be lightly dusted off and the damper will have nice a golden crust and will have a resonate sound when tapped your knuckles.

Add sultanas, cockies joy (golden syrup) jam (fruit conserve) or whatever you want to make a desert damper.
My favorite was rolly polly pudding which was cooked in a lidded basin in a billy can of boiling water.

A droving (cattle drive) camp cook was always judged by his dampers and overnight campsite selection.

My new camping trip trick is steaks marinated and packed in a plastic bag for the first night and cooking them on hot rocks.

If it don't kill ya it only makes ya tougher.

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PostPosted: Sat Jun 18, 2016 5:38 pm 
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Joined: Sat Nov 29, 2014 3:37 pm
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Location: Waikato, New Zealand
methanol wrote:
The traditional Aussie Bushmans way of making damper.

Plain flour a pinch of salt and water kneaded into a tacky dough, shaped up and dusted with a bit of dry flour.


That sounds like a really dense lump of bread, are you sure you don't add some baking powder or use self-raising flour? That's the only difference between what you describe and what I make, except I cook mine in a frypan with a lid.


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