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PostPosted: Wed Apr 06, 2016 8:43 pm 
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Adventure Rider
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Joined: Tue Dec 15, 2015 9:03 am
Posts: 914
Location: Central PA
The topic of first aid kits and items came up in my thread topic17404.html about my awesome "Adventure Vest". Haters gonna hate. :rofl:

I'm going to do a multi-part post here and brain dump a number of topics on the subject. In addition to sparking thought, discussion and contribution from others, I'm also using this as a vehicle for my own evaluation of what I have and what I do as I research and record things.

First things first:

Disclaimer:

I am not a doctor. I am not a world renowned expert on wilderness medicine. I used to be a Boy Scout, Soldier and an EMT. Depending on your country or state, an EMT is not a doctor nor a paramedic licensed for invasive emergency procedures or the administration of drugs. In my state EMTs perform BLS (basic life support), patient stabilization (bleeding, breathing, shock, drug addict control), transport and assist paramedics who provide ALS (advanced life support).

Topics of first aid and preparedness for medical events has been an interest of mine since I was a kid and continues to this day. What I am sharing here are my personal experiences, opinions and thoughts on the topic at hand, which is the philosophy and construction of a first aid kit to assist you in responding to an immediate medical situation or injury until professional help arrives. (Without spending a fortune.) What I will stay away from is delving into performing medical procedures or actions except in general terms as relates to equipment and supplies. I'll be concentrating on equipment primarily.

It is "bro" knowledge sharing and is not to be considered a substitute for professional medical advice, training, care or research on your own part. I could be wrong about something. Procedures and gear change over time. My opinion might differ from others, etc. Your doctor might have different information and recommendations for you based on your age, health and other variables. Check with him or her. You use this information at your own risk. If you get died or sick, it's on you.

End-Disclaimer

Ok, so where to begin? Let's begin at the beginning. Our first order of business before we start putting together a kit is to ask oneself, "Do I know what the hell I'm doing?" A trauma surgeon with a minimal kit is going to be more effective than someone with no training that shows up with a very nice medical bag full of "stuff" they have no idea how to use. That's just the nature of things. But that same guy is going to be a lot more use than someone who shows up with nothing, stands on the sidelines and stares.

We can't all be skilled surgeons but everyone starts from ground zero and builds from there. If you currently have no first aid training, having first aid supplies isn't useless or stupid. Someone else present might have better skills or training and can use your gear. It never hurts to be prepared. Just like in a firefight no one wished for less ammo, in a medical emergency no one is going to complain about having medical supplies. If someone is bleeding very badly, having a means to stop or slow the bleeding with good medical kit is better and much more effective than taking off your sweaty t-shirt and wrapping it around the wound. Though that will do if it's all you have.

We've all learned some basic first aid skills along the way in life such as applying pressure to a wound, how to pop zits, etc. What I'm encouraging you to do is to take it up a notch and expand on that. If you have a group of guys that you ride with regularly, then maybe you should be the guy in the group to suggest a Friday evening or Saturday morning and attending a CPR/First Aid class together. You can also "group buy" supplies and split them up between you. Or perhaps you are a family man with kids. Well then get a sitter and you and the wife go together. It's like date night but with slightly less arguing and more blood.

As this is an international forum I expect there are a number of courses offered in all countries. Here in the USA we have the American Red Cross and a number of community colleges and municipal recreation centers that offer weekend and evening first aid classes of various levels. So let me suggest some to you:

Basics:

http://www.redcross.org/

American Red Cross Adult CPR/AED - about 3 hours.

American Red Cross Adult First Aid CPR/AED - about 6 hours. Combo class - first aid and CPR.

American Red Cross BLS for Healthcare Providers - about 6 hours. Gets into more advanced topics like obstructed airways, child, infant, etc.

American Red Cross Wilderness and Remote First Aid - you must be currently certified in CPR/AED prior to class start.

Advanced Subjects:

http://www.redcross.org/

American Red Cross Emergency Medical Responder- about a two month course, couple nights a week, Saturday mornings.

American Red Cross Emergency Medical Technician - about three to four month course, couple nights a week, Saturdays, training exercises.

https://www.itrauma.org/

ITLS - International Trauma Life Support - this is offered here at the local community college. It is an international program with courses in many countries. Various levels of certification.

Books:

If you just can't attend a course (come on man, yes you can) then let me suggest some books for your bookshelf:

First let me introduce you to the US Army publication site where all non-classified field manuals can be downloaded in PDF. http://armypubs.army.mil/doctrine/Active_FM.html You'll need a login for others.
Here is the medical section: http://armypubs.army.mil/doctrine/8_Ser ... ion_1.html
And the current PDF link to a good (but a little rough) basic first aid publication TC-4-02.1 First Aid: http://armypubs.army.mil/doctrine/DR_pu ... 4_02x1.pdf

Moving on to paper books - which are good when the power is out, like in the woods:

Things you can stuff in your kit:

EMS Field Guide - BLS
http://www.amazon.com/EMS-Field-Guide-B ... cket+guide

Emergency First Aid - Pocket Tutor:
http://www.amazon.com/Emergency-First-A ... 29SKW32AYD

First Aid Specific:

ACEP Manual (American College of Emergency Physicians) First Aid Guide:
http://www.amazon.com/ACEP-First-Aid-Ma ... aid+manual

More Advanced/Broader:

Medicine for the Outdoors:
http://www.amazon.com/Medicine-Outdoors ... nual&psc=1

Special Forces Operations Medical Handbook:
http://www.amazon.com/Special-Operation ... l+handbook

Very Broad in Scope:

Survival Medicine Handbook: Guide For When Help Is Not On The Way
http://www.amazon.com/The-Survival-Medi ... 9EY7CE4ANJ

Where There is No Doctor
http://www.amazon.com/Where-There-No-Do ... +no+doctor

Human Factors:

Let's talk about us for a second. (When your girl says that, trouble is brewing.) No one particularly likes the sight of blood or to think of what could go wrong. It's a bit against human nature, but things can go wrong and they can go wrong fast. If you make an investment in training or a couple of books you'll find the knowledge and experience will aid you in overcoming the "yuck" factor and will help you to avert a natural tendency to freeze for a moment, or longer, when someone is dicked up bad. I still remember the coroner coming in and giving us his case "slideshow" during my class. Some people felt faint, but the point was to start to desensitize ourselves to some of the grosser things we might encounter and to see what certain injuries look like so we would know what to expect.

We all hope our adventures will be nothing but sunshine and good times, but they aren't always. From minor mishaps with charcoal fluid at the barbecue, a drunken twisted ankle at the camp site or a crash or fall that causes a significant injury, things can and will happen. Being prepared in the mind and with equipment on hand is doing yourself, your friends and your loved ones a great service.

People have differing attitudes towards all this. I've found common ones to be:

The Dardevil: Nothing bad has happened before, so I don't even worry about it.
Mr Self Reliant: Nothing bad is going to happen, but if it does, I'll figure something out.
Mr Passive: If something happens, I'll call for help and everything will be okay.
The Realist: I hope nothing bad happens, but it can. I'm going to prepare for it and have a plan.

Be that last guy.

So with the disclaimer out of the way, and a exhortation to take up some training or reading, I'll conclude this first post. Next time we'll delve in together about kit philosophy and provide a guide for making decisions about what's right for you. Preview: one size does not fit all circumstances or people. But hey, if you just can't wait and have nothing at all, then I suggest throwing one of these in your tank bag for starters:

Adventure Medical Kits Trauma Pack
http://www.amazon.com/Adventure-Medical ... 003BS2PW4/


:Roost:

_________________
Professional American
Shinko 804/805s
Adventure Vest
DR650
DRZ400
2 Sons, 1 Labrador, 1 Cat

Scoreboard:

Concussions: 1
Broken Bones: 5
Plates: 1
Screws: 8

Giggles a plenty...


Last edited by LostInPA on Sun Apr 24, 2016 10:18 pm, edited 9 times in total.

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 Post subject: Re: On First Aid Kits:
PostPosted: Wed Apr 06, 2016 8:43 pm 
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Adventure Rider
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Joined: Tue Dec 15, 2015 9:03 am
Posts: 914
Location: Central PA
Kit Construction Philosophy:

Ok, in this part we'll discuss things to think about before starting to assemble our kits. In my way of thinking kits should have a specific design around them based on what the requirements and potential injuries can be. For example, a medic in the Army will carry quite a bit of gear to deal with things like gunshot wounds, traumatic amputations, etc. Things we are unlikely, and hopefully not going to see when we are out on our bikes. You can't carry everything so it's important to try to carry the most pertinent items. Let's dive in.

Important Considerations:

To help plot out our kit there are a few starting questions you need to consider: where will you be?, what will you be doing?, who will you be with?, can you carry it?

Where Will You Be?:

The question itself is simple but coming up with the answer can be more complicated than it first appears. It's best illustrated with a couple examples. I live a few hundred yards from a regional trauma center that includes a life flight helicopter unit. When I am out riding around town I have to drive past it to get out of my neighborhood. I would say odds are good that at any given intersection there are a number of doctors and nurses waiting in their cars at the lights going to and from work, and quite often there is an ambulance. DRGrifter goes and rides Baja. He's in a foreign country and has reported incidents where they have been six hours from the nearest anything.

Given those two examples, what are the odds DRGrifter needs a more extensive medical kit in Baja than I do riding around town? Do I need a way to stitch up a wound riding around town? Nope. Would a clotting agent, suture kit or a skin stapler be something DRGrifter might be interested in? Yep.

When looking at where you will be, the main point is "How far from professional medical treatment will I be and how long is the response time until help arrives?" This is critical. The further out from civilization you go, and the longer the predicted response time (note I said predicted - nothing is guaranteed - emergency services are delivered best effort) , the more extensive your kit will need to be.

Not just for trauma items, but boo boos and everything else. The further out you are the more serious any injury or condition becomes. Having a couple days diarrhea and the flu at your house is annoying and bothersome but at least you have your comfy couch and your TV to occupy yourself between bathroom runs. Maybe your mom will stop by to check on you and bring you soup. Having the same thing happen to you 300 miles into the wilderness with limited supplies, a crappy foam mat to lay on and not so great drinking water takes on a new level of seriousness. In other words, everything starts to ratchet up the degree of difficulty it will cause you and the likelihood that something will get worse and not better. Non-fatal injuries and conditions can start to veer into life threatening.

You might be so far out in the bush that you will need to do what's called a "self rescue" for yourself or your buddy. Basically it means that help is not on the way, and the only way you're getting it is to make it out of wherever you are on your own and find it. But It's also important to note that being far away from help doesn't necessarily depend on distance. Other factors to consider are terrain and communications.

Maybe you are riding two hours outside of town but the terrain or trail you are on would be impassable for an ambulance. If you're 20 miles down the trail and one of the riders in your group gets badly injured what's your plan? Will you call for help? Okay, but what if you don't have cell reception? Do you have a backup method of summoning help like a Spot or In-Reach? That might be something to consider getting if your adventures routinely take you off the beaten path. Being far away from help could have little to nothing to do with distance and everything to do with the fact that you are without a cell signal at the worst possible moment.

Here in the United States and most Western nations medical services are top notch and rescue services are well organized. However that might not be the case when traveling outside of such areas. If you're doing a big trip investigate what the conditions are for such things.

Also consider that rescue services might be busy when you need them. You call in reporting a rider down but unfortunately there was an accident on the highway involving a bus full of passengers. All of the resources are tied up right now. They'll get to you when they can, but until then you have to be prepared to hold your own.

A small rural community will have fewer responders available than a major city but odds are they aren't as busy. If you call them, unless something else is going on, all of them will come to get in on the action. :biggrin:

In a major city it's a bit if a toss up. Someone will come, sooner or later. Generally speaking, your best responses are going to come from the suburbs and medium sized towns with their own hospitals. Which may or may not play into the equation depending on where you are. So as stated, don't plan on a five minute response. Always plan for and assume it might be some time before you see the flashing lights approaching.

Finally, in the equation of where you will be, take account of environmental dangers such as weather, terrain type and nasty critters big and small that you should be wary of. Note that predators also come on two legs so take appropriate precautions to avoid trouble. Also research plants that might be a hazard to you or your bike. Out West they have thorns that will go through your tire. Poison ivy, or its equivalent in other regions, etc. can spoil your trip. Someone might be severely allergic to bee stings. Heat injuries might be a concern or hypothermia. Find out.

What Will You Be Doing?

Well obviously you'll be riding a motorcycle for a large portion of the time but what else? Will you also be camping? Maybe when you get to camp you plan to go on a hike or fishing and filet the catch and cook over an open fire. Whatever combination of activities you will be doing, take them into consideration when planning your kit. As stated, you can't carry everything in the world or have the paramedics follow you around in their truck so you're going to have to winnow it down at some point. Especially on a motorcycle with space limitations.

You'll want to do some research on injuries common to the activities you will be engaged in and use that to help you select supplies for your kit. Now a few that come to mind with motorcycling would be things such as a broken arm or shin. Abrasion injuries (road rash). Delving into more serious things, a punctured lung from a broken rib, a head injury, a compound fracture with heavy bleeding. Give consideration to what common injuries and boo boos are for the activities you'll be doing and what is required to treat or stabilize them until professional help can be obtained.

Always being mindful of point number one, where will you be? The supplies needed to stabilize an injury for ten minutes until an ambulance arrives are are a lot less than if you are trying to stabilize the same injury for a three hour wait while the forest rangers locate you.

But don't forget camp. What's something most people do at camp? Play with knives and fire of course! So you'll need to account for minor burns and minor to severe cuts as well. Plus hangovers. (Hint: 2 bags of Pedialyte rehydration powdered drink mix in 1 liter of water.) :2_thumbsup:

Who Will You Be With?

There's safety in numbers. Whether walking around New Orleans at 3:00 AM or riding or hiking out in the wilds, the more people you have along the safer you will be as there are more hands to deal with a situation. Now I talked in post one about training, so I'll just reiterate that trained hands are better prepared to be helping hands, but even untrained hands are better than none.

The worst scenario that you can be in, no matter what you are doing, is to be injured and alone. Throw in no supplies or being immobile or separated from them, no communications and a bad injury can become a fatal one. The buddy system. Use it. If nothing else, always let someone know where you're are going and what time you can be expected back if you are off on an adventure. If riding solo I would suggest to you that you keep a cellphone and a small medical kit directly on your person in case you take a tumble and become separated from the bike or are unable to reach it.

So let's say you've got a buddy or two that you're riding with. Great! You need to have a talk before you set out, and preferably not in the driveway two minutes before leaving on the big trip. You need to know what training people have. Do they have a severe allergy or medical condition? Do they take a medication that could be a problem or that a responding medic might need to know about? Where do they keep it? Is there anything you need to know about using it if you have to? Do they have a first aid kit?

Ideally you and your riding buddies should coordinate the exchange of such information well before your ride. If you need to call in for help it would be really beneficial to be able to tell the responding medics that the patient is a diabetic, or that they are allergic to penicillin. Hopefully you've also discussed what you'll generally do in an emergency based on where you will be and what you will be doing. Let everyone in your group know where everyone keeps their medical supplies. It wouldn't hurt to do a little show and tell and review the kit contents with each other.

The time to figure this out is not on the trail when someone dumps it and breaks their leg. Do your homework. Have a plan. If someone invited me to go on a trip with them that involved wildeness or off-road but couldn't be bothered to spend 15-30 minutes going over this stuff, I probably wouldn't go. I'd have to assume things like food, water and fuel were also outside the scope of their concerns or planning capabilities.

Obviously if there is a group of guys or gals that you regularly ride with you can spend more time on this and plan together. This would be especially key on any long term ride or adventure. If you happen to meet up with an impromptu group on the trail and decide to ride together at least point out to the others that you have a first aid kit and where it is.

While we're on the topic of information I'd encourage you to consider doing the following: Print out some emergency info cards and have them laminated. Place one in the pocket of each of your riding jackets and your camp jacket, one more in the tank bag. That way you won't have to bother remembering which jacket it's in or to switch it. If you travel outside English speaking regions print a few in the native language of where you will travel. It could also be useful to print a card with some phrases you can say or point to such as:

I need a doctor.
I need a pharmacy.
Your women. How much for the women?

On the card list the following information:

1. Your Name.
2. Your SSN or National ID Number.
3. Date of Birth.
4. Your Address and Phone Number.
5. Emergency Contact Name and Number. Two is better. Usually a relative who is familiar with your medical history is best.
6. Your Blood Type. If you don't know it you can have your doctor order a test. It's better to know it.
7. Any Existing Conditions You Have. What medications you take for them, dosage and times.
8. Any Allergies, especially to medications. If you have none put the abbreviation NKDA on the card. (No Known Drug Allergies)
9. Name of Your Medical Insurer.

Okay, moving on...

Can You Carry It?

It would be nice to have all the supplies to be found in an Advanced Life Support response vehicle, but we can't carry all that. If you're going somewhere with vehicle support then your options are a lot less limited. However on a motorcycle things like C-Collars and Back Boards are probably out of the question. Unless you're on a BMW and can fit them in with your other household goods. :s_rofl

So as we work through these things you want to keep in mind that you are size and weight constrained. In upcoming posts I will go over some motorcycle friendly bags and things but you'll need to begin considering how you might transport your supplies, where you will put them (quick access is key) and how much of your carry capacity you can devote to medical supplies. It's a world of compromises and there is no perfect answer. It can help to sort things into must haves and nice to haves. For example, in my mind a tourniquet is a must have, an air splint is a nice to have, and so on.

If you're using the buddy system or traveling with a group you can certainly split up the supplies between you but if doing so be very careful about how you go about it. In such a scenario I would recommend a small personal trauma kit that always stays with each man. In the event it is needed you use that man's kit to treat him first. If he gets evacced out you still have your personal kit for you should you need it.

You'll also need to decide how you'll split up the supplies. If there is little to no chance that you will be separated then it's probably okay to just split the kit up evenly for the most part. If there is a chance you will be separated for any period then it might be better to setup each man's main kit as independently functional as possible. Keep in mind that any item that requires another item to function should always stay together. A mundane example would be a stethoscope and a blood pressure cuff. Having the cuff will do you no good if the stethoscope is on the other side of the mountain with your buddy.

Also, when we're talking about splitting up kits, we're talking about a very extensive amount of supplies for multiple people on a multi-day scenario. Under ordinary circumstances don't split up a kit that you use for day riding or a weekend camp out, unless of course due to where you will be and what you will be doing you will have that much gear.

Pro Tip: In an emergency, if someone has to go run for help, make sure that they drop the kit or their part of it with the people staying with the injured person. Easy to forget in the heat of the moment. Don't forget. That is bad.

So now let's talk a little about injuries, or injury classification...

Injury Classification:

Classification will help you to begin to sort out what supplies you might need and to organize them when you get them. Supplies for one category should never be mixed in with another, unless they are kept in their own sub-container and clearly labeled. You do not want to be digging through a pile of antacid tablets when you need to find a tourniquet. The way that I classify injuries/conditions is to divide them into three main categories, while taking into account the scope of where we will be, what we will be doing and who we will be with:

Existing Conditions: this is any medical condition you have for which you require medications or other supplies. If you have high blood pressure and take medication for it, or perhaps are a diabetic and need to monitor your insulin, those items fall into this category. These supplies should be kept in their own container and clearly labeled.

One tip here is take twice as much. Say you are planning a three day ride and camp, and you take a daily medication. Bring a weeks worth and keep in two spots. You might drop a pill down the sink, you might lose one bottle, etc.

Please don't travel around with all of your pills loose in a ziplock bag. The police, they don't like that, especially if one of your medications is highly regulated. You can visit your pharmacy and they will print a label for your current prescription and put it on a bottle for you to use for travel. Make sure you keep the info on the travel bottle current as it can tell others what it is and your dosage in case they need to retrieve it for you.

Boo Boos: this is any injury or condition that merely causes discomfort or which does not require any immediate professional medical attention. In other words, non life threatening injuries or conditions. Some examples of boo boos might be an upset stomach, a minor cut sustained while doing something at the camp site, or a sprained ankle. Supplies for dealing with boo boos should be kept in their own container, or in a sub-container if in the main medical kit and clearly labeled. Bear in mind what we discussed earlier, the farther out from help you are, the greater the likelihood that a boo boo can shift to the trauma category.

Trauma: for our purposes trauma is defined as any injury or condition for which you require professional medical attention. Trauma supplies should be in their own container and clearly labeled. When you need these items you need them fast. It pays to further organize the trauma supplies into sub-sections and label them. To that end within the trauma category I would further subdivide things into a few key areas:

Breathing: supplies for restoring and maintaining patient breathing. Such as a CPR mask, or a nasal or oral airway.

Bleeding: supplies for dealing with major bleeding wounds or any wound that would require stitches until such time as you can get to a facility.

Broken: supplies for dealing with broken bones.

Shock: supplies for monitoring patient vitals and to deal with symptoms of shock.

Head and Neck: supplies for dealing with head and neck injuries.

Temperature Injuries: Hyperthermia (heat stroke), Hypothermia (freezing to death). They can kill you.

Disease: this is more for you world travelers and deep wilderness explorers, but if you will be in a region where you can contract a debilitating or life threatening disease/fever, wound infection or parasitic infection, consider it trauma.

Now that all sounds like a lot of gear required, and it might be, but that depends on the factors we first discussed. By way of example, if I'm going camping overnight by myself I have a trauma bag that's about 6x9x4 and a small boo boo bag. They both go in a labeled red dry-bag. I'm at a state park, I have cellphone coverage and there are park rangers and other people about 24/7. I don't need a 25 pound portable hospital backpack.

If I'm riding around town all I really need is a cellphone and breath mints in case I run into any cute nurses. If you told me "Hey pack your bags we're headed to the desert for two weeks!" I'm taking a lot more supplies.

Continuing on...

The above listed trauma areas could mean lots of different things depending on what we are doing. Referring to the earlier example of the combat medic, breathing supplies might include items to deal with a sucking chest wound and to perform an emergency tracheotomy. Those items are not likely to be on our list of must haves when motorcycling. When I go to my shooting club I do take supplies with me to deal with a sucking chest wound and a gunshot in case someone has an accident or an unfortunate intersection of lack of common sense combined with inept handling of a firearm. Darwin.

Summing Up

This is a lot of information to digest and hopefully it gets you thinking about your needs. Keep in mind that all of the above can change on any given ride or adventure. It always comes back to those first few questions in order to determine more precisely what your medical loadout will be. However, I do think you'll find that there are common items/staples that are generally the core in every kit and which will form the basis for extending your capabilities depending on changing requirements.

Until next time...

_________________
Professional American
Shinko 804/805s
Adventure Vest
DR650
DRZ400
2 Sons, 1 Labrador, 1 Cat

Scoreboard:

Concussions: 1
Broken Bones: 5
Plates: 1
Screws: 8

Giggles a plenty...


Last edited by LostInPA on Sun Apr 24, 2016 10:47 pm, edited 24 times in total.

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 Post subject: Re: On First Aid Kits:
PostPosted: Wed Apr 06, 2016 8:44 pm 
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Adventure Rider
Adventure Rider
User avatar

Joined: Tue Dec 15, 2015 9:03 am
Posts: 914
Location: Central PA
Here I will be posting info on commercial off the shelf kits.

_________________
Professional American
Shinko 804/805s
Adventure Vest
DR650
DRZ400
2 Sons, 1 Labrador, 1 Cat

Scoreboard:

Concussions: 1
Broken Bones: 5
Plates: 1
Screws: 8

Giggles a plenty...


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 Post subject: Re: On First Aid Kits:
PostPosted: Wed Apr 06, 2016 8:44 pm 
Offline
Adventure Rider
Adventure Rider
User avatar

Joined: Tue Dec 15, 2015 9:03 am
Posts: 914
Location: Central PA
Here I will be posting info on contents for roll your own kits. Basic supplies and advanced gear. Plus a couple Hmm items.

_________________
Professional American
Shinko 804/805s
Adventure Vest
DR650
DRZ400
2 Sons, 1 Labrador, 1 Cat

Scoreboard:

Concussions: 1
Broken Bones: 5
Plates: 1
Screws: 8

Giggles a plenty...


Last edited by LostInPA on Wed Apr 06, 2016 8:47 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject: Re: On First Aid Kits:
PostPosted: Wed Apr 06, 2016 8:45 pm 
Offline
Adventure Rider
Adventure Rider
User avatar

Joined: Tue Dec 15, 2015 9:03 am
Posts: 914
Location: Central PA
Here I will be posting info and examples of containers and bags for roll your own kits that are generally motorcycle friendly.

_________________
Professional American
Shinko 804/805s
Adventure Vest
DR650
DRZ400
2 Sons, 1 Labrador, 1 Cat

Scoreboard:

Concussions: 1
Broken Bones: 5
Plates: 1
Screws: 8

Giggles a plenty...


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 12, 2016 3:23 pm 
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Joined: Wed Apr 06, 2016 12:04 pm
Posts: 6
Location: New Hampshire
I would suggest Adventure Medical Kits

USA made out of Littleton, New Hampshire

You can get them on Ebay & Amazon buy from a local dealer that sells there stuff or they may be old crap

Also I would suggest get some Quickclot packs. Stop bleeding quickly

They also have Bivvys and sleeping bags etc

I used all their stuff last year on a 5 day adventure out of Melbourne, Australia.

Didn't need anything but it's light and compact. Peace of mind!


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 13, 2016 4:24 am 
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Joined: Thu Oct 22, 2015 1:46 am
Posts: 21
Location: USA,Utah,Riverton
Very cool topic. This is one of those things I worry about a bit myself, as no one knows when something bad will happen. On top of it all, even if I do have some basic classroom knowledge and a basic kit, am I really going to have what I need (in both materials and knowledge), should something happen.

What I ended up doing for my kit is I started with http://www.amazon.com/Adventure-Medical ... B000G7WRBC and added some items I felt it was missing. Most of it does fit in the bag, but a few things like the SAM Split and Israeli Bandage.

Some of the things I added off the top of my head:
SAM Split
Israeli Bandage
Tweezers
Clippers
Personal Medication (Claritin, etc)
Extra Meds (Pain Killers, Benedryl)
Additional 4x4 and 3x3 gauze pads (2 ea)
Additional tape
Additional Bandaids
Neosporin
Wound Seal
Clotting Sponge
Super glue

Seems like possibly a few other things, but I'm not going to pull it from the bike to check.


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PostPosted: Sun Apr 24, 2016 3:30 pm 
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Updated with the next part.

Thanks,

Steve

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Shinko 804/805s
Adventure Vest
DR650
DRZ400
2 Sons, 1 Labrador, 1 Cat

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PostPosted: Mon Apr 25, 2016 7:18 am 
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Adventure Rider
Adventure Rider
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Joined: Thu Dec 04, 2014 6:50 am
Posts: 869
Location: Michigan
Great info in this post. I've been slacking on putting together a decent carry kit, but this will definitely help for this summers big adventure. :good:

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2013 DR 650
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PostPosted: Mon Apr 25, 2016 7:50 am 
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Trail Rider
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Joined: Sun Apr 03, 2016 8:00 pm
Posts: 91
Location: Tampa Area
Location: Tampa Area
I have a very extensive first aid kit, but living near coast line Florida it's part of my hurricane preparation supplies, not mc travel. As stated earlier, I think non-medical peeps need a good, easy to read book that explains what you may be dealing with, what to do and then how to do it. I have purchased a couple first aid books over the years for my hurricane preparation supplies and chucked all but one ... listed in the first post, it's Medicine for the Outdoors, by Paul S. Auerbach, MD. 553 pages, diagrams, extensive index and glossary. Seems comprehensive and I can understand it.

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Devils Creek DR, KamoKLR, Versys Ventures


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